Naming Places

All geographic features across the City of Vincent require a name. Some existing names featured in the City are steeped in history, and some a product of an earlier time. The City’s Naming Places program provides for opportunities to validate proposed names for unnamed features, and dual or renaming can be considered. Naming proposals can be submitted for anything from iconic Vincent locations to long forgotten rear lanes.

The City of Vincent is home to a number of lanes that remain unnamed, and we believe that the best source of names is, and always will be, the community.

If you know of an unnamed lane, or feel that there is an opportunity for dual naming (Noongyar alongside English), please review Road Naming Criteria and complete the Application.

Resources

Road Naming Application

Road Naming Procedure

Landgate Geographic Naming Policy

Laneways and Rights Of Way Policy 2.2.8

Naming of City Facilities Policy 4.1.18

FAQ's

Can I name a place after my family?

Commemorative names are allowed.

However, an application needs to be accompanied by evidence of service to the community in Vincent or to the betterment of the City.

Is long term ownership of land sufficient to name a place after my family? 

(ie. Property owned by the same family for over one hundred years)

No. Land ownership is not a valid reason for a commemorative name.

Can I suggest an Aboriginal word for dual naming or on an unnamed lane?

Landgate and the City both encourage the proposal of Aboriginal language for naming roads, parks and other places across the City. All Aboriginal language proposed is subject to additional criteria, including:

  • Language local to the place (likely Noongyar);
  • Receiving endorsement from the City’s RAP working group (or similar); and
  • Written consideration matching the significance of the word with the significance of the place.

What names are suitable?

Any proposed name must fit within one of the following categories:

  • Aboriginal language name;
  • Vincent identity;
  • Historic business;
  • Local flora and/or fauna;
  • Historic event;
  • Architectural style;
  • Artwork;
  • Waterway;
  • Culturally iconic element.

What evidence is needed to prove a name has historical relevance?

Any photography, letters, awards, newspaper articles or other similar details will make your proposal stronger. If you are needing assistance, or desire access to the City’s resources on local history, our Local History Centre is open Monday to Friday, 9am until 1pm.